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ROTOR, new title sponsor of the WNT-ROTOR Pro Cycling team for 2018

ROTOR, new title sponsor of the WNT-ROTOR Pro Cycling team for 2018

ROTOR is delighted to announce we will become the title sponsor of the WNT-ROTOR Pro Cycling team for the 2018 season supplying all cycling components for this elite group of professional women cyclists.

ROTOR has been closely involved with the team since its foundation in 2014 and the unique partnership means WNT-ROTOR Pro Cycling will be the only UCI registered team equipped with UNO, the first complete road groupset with hydraulic-actuated shifting and braking.

 

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The UNO groupset will be mounted on the Orbea Orca OMR road bike with 2INpower power meter, Q RINGS and the innovative ROTOR RVOLVER® hubs which are all CNC machined using WNT cutting tools at ROTOR’s manufacturing facilities in Madrid.

With the new season fast approaching, WNT-ROTOR Pro Cycling will become a test and development team for ROTOR products, who will be taking on the highest level of UCI racing throughout Europe.   

 

 

ROTOR CEO, Jose Manuel Banqueri, commented “We’re extremely proud to be associated with WNT-ROTOR Pro Cycling team. They are pioneers in women’s professional cycling and we look forward to working together in both product development and competition in the coming season.”

Claude Sun, World MD of WNT-Ceratizit and team manager of WNT-ROTOR Pro Cycling added “It is the next logical evolution between ROTOR and WNT in our concept in investing in Women’s cycling with a pro cycling team. Together we hope to make 2018 our most successful year as a Pro Cycling team and continue to improve both ROTOR products and our riders.”   

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Riders for 2018: Anna Badegruber, Lydia Boylan, Natalie Grinczer, Hayley Jones, Melissa Lowther, Elise Maes, Eileen Roe, Hayley Simmonds, Aafke Soet and Lea Lin Teutenberg.

How to Set Your Optimum Chainring Position (OCP)

How to Set Your Optimum Chainring Position (OCP)

Switching from using round chainrings to ROTOR’s Q-Rings is easy, but it does require some initial setup followed by a transition period for full adaptation.

Why Q?

Optimum Chainring Position (OCP) is what allows you to vary the rotational position of a Q-Ring, thereby enabling you to adjust it to the precise point where you deliver maximum power during a single pedal rotation.

ROTOR suggests the following initial OCP setups by discipline:

  • Road: Position 3
  • Triathlon and TT: Position 4
  • MTB: Position 3

Because Q-Rings use leg muscles differently than round chainrings, your muscles will need time to adapt to the new, more efficient way of pedalling. Adaptation is a gradual process covering four stages with each stage taking between one day and one week. Most riders will require at least 10 hours of pedalling time to make the full transition.

Stage 1

In stage 1, you will learn to pedal more efficiently. Pedalling may initially feel different, and you may find yourself turning the pedals at a faster or slower rate than your usual cadence. Don’t worry about any initial jerkiness – it will smooth out over time.

Stage 2

You will start to feel more capable and more powerful in stage 2, and your spin will improve on climbs. Many who suffer knee pain will start to notice it less – assuming their OCP is correctly adjusted.

Stage 3 + 4

Stage 3 will bring improved biomechanical efficiency, which produces a smoother pedal stroke due to fuller activation of muscle groups. You will be creating more power than with round chainrings. If you experience no issues during this stage, you have correctly set your OCP and are onto Stage 4 of adaptation. Those encountering issues should read on for further OCP setting instructions.

If you experience the following symptoms, you are arriving at the max chainring diameter too late because your OCP number is too big, and you should reduce your OCP by one setting:

  • You accelerate and sprint easily, but have difficulty maintaining speed.
  • You feel pedalling resistance too late in your pedal stroke and/or you are hyperextending your ankle.
  • You need a lower cadence to be comfortable.
  • Your sit further forward than usual to pedal comfortably.
  • You are comfortable pedalling while standing, but not while seated.
  • You have new pain at the back of your leg behind your knee.

On the other hand, if your OCP is set too low, you will find yourself arriving at the max chainring diameter too soon during your pedal stroke. You should increase your OCP setting by one if you experience the following:

  • You find it easy to maintain a steady speed but have difficulty accelerating and sprinting.
  • You feel pedalling resistance too early in your pedal stroke and/or you are hyperflexing your ankle.
  • You need a higher cadence to be comfortable.
  • You sit further back than usual to pedal comfortably.
  • You are comfortable pedalling while seated, but not while standing.
  • You have a new pain at the front of your knee.

Once you’ve got your OCP correctly adjusted, it’s time for stage 4 and final adaptation, which comes naturally with more cumulative pedalling time using Q-Rings.

A few final setup notes

Different bikes may need different OCPs – don’t assume you will use the same position on each of your bikes.

Adjacent chainrings in multi-ring setups may require different OCP’s.

Road Q-Rings and QXL have five OCP points while MTB Q-Rings have three OCP points.

If you are using a Micro Adjust Spider (MAS), your number of OCP points is effectively doubled because it reduces the angle between OCP points by 2.5 degrees, thereby offering micro adjustments. In this case, you should adjust your OCP in 1/2-step increments.