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How to Use Psychology to Improve Your Cycling Performance

How to Use Psychology to Improve Your Cycling Performance

Having a great ride or race on a bike isn’t just about your body performing optimally; it also requires your mind to be healthy and work well. Recent studies attribute 80% of success in sports to physical factors like fitness and skill and 20% to psychological factors.

Read on for tips about what you can do to boost your own performance through psychology.

Build Strong Support

The best riders draw upon a strong support network. Think parents, significant others, coaches, friends, teachers and teammates. A good support crew is always there for you – whether you are doing well or struggling. They are there for you when things are good and when things are bad.

Let’s consider the example of a supportive parent. Your mom or dad is going to love you, no matter whether you win that Olympic gold medal or finish last in your local championship race. Yes, he or she will celebrate with you if you do make the podium, but they’ll also take care of you when you are sick, injured or just feeling down. And it’s their enduring support that is so important – because they are with you through your tough times, they best appreciate and help you celebrate your good times.

Set Goals

If you really want to accomplish something, set a goal. Write it down and be explicit. Plot your path toward achieving that goal. Break the effort up into small, attainable steps and work on them one by one. There’s nothing like a well-defined goal to give you the motivation needed to accomplish it.

Let’s say, for example, that you struggle to push yourself to train throughout the winter months when it’s cold, dark and often precipitating. Set a goal to do well at a spring or early summer event, and then plan your training to build up for that event. It will be easier to go to the gym or head outside and ride if you have a purpose.

Visualize Your Success

Top pros don’t want until race day to mentally get themselves on the podium. In the months, weeks and days leading up to a big event, they visualize themselves performing well in their target event. They mentally practice what they will think and feel and visualize in their mind what they will do ahead of the big day so that when that day comes, it’s familiar.

For example, imagine you are training for a 20km time trial. Set aside time during training to sit quietly with your eyes closed and mentally run through what you will experience the day of the race. Visualize what you do before, during and after the time trial. What will you eat for breakfast? What will you wear? How will you warm up? What will you think and feel in the race? How will you look and feel on the podium afterward? Imagine yourself preparing well and then pushing through the difficulties of the time trial to get that personal best or to make that podium.

Build Confidence

Believe in yourself and what you can do on a bike. Confidence inevitably arises when you work on the factors mentioned above. When you have a good support network, when you’ve set reasonable goals and trained accordingly and when you’ve visualized yourself meeting those goals ahead of time, you’ll feel good about yourself and be much more likely to actually achieve your goals.